Johnny Lee Park

Author & Writer

Essential Characteristics That Every Teenager Should Possess

Sincerity be damned; it is all too easy to focus on the negative aspects when it comes to teenage personality traits. Moodiness, secrecy, and stubbornness are all likely to come to mind.  However, it’s crucial to consider positive characteristics and how to develop them for success.

Positive characteristics that will aid in the development of a well-rounded and happy teenager – and eventually adult – are most likely already developing in you. All you have to do is help them flourish. These personality traits you acquire will help you succeed in your studies and future careers, as well as develop meaningful relationships with the people in your life.

This blog will discuss the essential personality traits that will give you, as a teen, the edge to succeed in life. Continue reading to learn more.

Resilience

How well do you recover from setbacks in life? Resilience is a crucial teen personality trait because it indicates a person’s ability to deal with failure. When things don’t go as planned, resilient people will pick themselves up, dust themselves off, and try again, until they succeed. They are more likely to take chances or take on challenges because they are confident in their ability to bounce back from failure and keep trying. Additionally, it is essential to remember that failures and errors are all part of a learning process and should be learned from to avoid repetition. You can develop resilience by motivating yourself to take on challenges and praising your efforts rather than your results.

Recommended read: “Broken” is a magnificent read that focuses on Cass, an outsider in her own community. However, how she manages herself and takes a leap of confidence and resilience to overcome the guilt and pain is truly life inspiring. You can also get to learn more about herself, her personality, her incredible journey, and many specific traits such as resilience, confidence, and hope by reading this book. “Broken” is available on Amazon for purchase.

Confidence

Despite the fact that many teenagers struggle with confidence, it is one of the qualities required for success in life. Being a teenager can be a tough gig, and with so many emotions and changes going on, it’s inevitable that their self-confidence can take a knock. But here is the thing, confidence, like every life trait, can be learned, harnessed, and developed by practicing specific actions—so that it becomes easy for you to be confident, persuasive, able to make compelling arguments, and adept at achieving challenging objectives. Here are some simple ways to do that:

  • Encourage yourself to participate in team activities where you can add your voice to a common goal.
  • Bring your point of view to the forefront, even if you believe it will have little impact.
  • Participate in discussions on topics about which you are passionate and knowledgeable.
  • Read a good book like “Broken” to learn how to be more confident and expressive.

Adaptability

Adaptability is one of the best qualities a teenager can have today. It is the foremost thing that can aid them to adjust in accordance with the life changes and routines as they move further in life ahead. Plus, it will also help them figure out who and what they want to do or be—whether it is their career or personal life decision. The good news is that you can assist yourself in becoming more adaptable. How? By trying out new hobbies or socializing with people. You may feel a little awkward or uneasy in unfamiliar circumstances, and that’s okay. What is not okay is to keep yourself away from new opportunities. Additionally, it’s crucial that you consider your strengths and how you can use them to contribute to the situation in a positive way in a new setting. And once you understand how you fit into the bigger picture, you will be less likely to be stressed by the change. Want to know more? Consider reading “Broken,” a remarkable graphic novel that perfectly highlights the ability to cope with change and being adaptive.